Not everyone in Ohio has a traditional nine-to-five job. Some workers, such as healthcare workers, work long 12-hour shifts. Other workers, such as truck drivers, drive overnight instead of during the day. And certain workers such as security officers or some call center employees work third-shift instead of first-shift. However, these workers may be susceptible to drowsy driving.

The drowsy driving problem in the U.S.

Drowsy driving is an all-too-common incident. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that approximately one-quarter of adult motorists reported having fallen asleep while behind the wheel in the past 30 days. In addition, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, driver fatigue played a roll in 72,000 motor vehicle accidents in 2013, causing 44,000 injuries and 800 fatalities.

Who drives drowsy?

In addition to third-shift drivers and drivers who work long hours, there are other people who can drive fatigued even during the traditional nine-to-five commute. Those who stayed up too late and did not get an adequate amount of sleep may drive drowsy. Those with sleep disorders that are not being properly treated may also drive drowsy. The use of certain over-the-counter medications and prescription medications can also cause drowsiness.

Drowsy driving accidents can lead to financial distress

When a drowsy driver causes a car crash that injures another person, the accident victim may be left with hefty medical bills and may be unable to work, leading to further financial distress. Drivers should not expect their insurance company to cover all the expenses they incurred due to the collision. After all, insurance companies are ultimately looking out for their bottom line and may offer a settlement that is less than adequate. Attorneys with experience dealing with insurance companies and who are dedicated to helping those involved in car crashes may be a useful resource in such situations.